Wednesday, May 24, 2006

Plastic Plumbing - some queries examined

Is plastic plumbing the way of the future? Or a nightmare best left well alone? Since it’s introduction, in the late 70s, it has had a chequered history, and that is being polite. There have been some spectacular failures where joints have blown apart, usually because they were incorrectly assembled, and in the USA, one form of plastic pipe, polybutylene, is subject to thousands of class action law suits and is no longer commercially available, although, curiously, it continues to be sold almost everywhere else, without causing any undue concern or long term problems.

Plastic plumbing received a big boost in the late 90s when a number of new manufacturers entered the field and it started to become widely available from builder’s merchants and DIY stores. It’s also benefited from the uptake in underfloor heating systems which all have to be plumbed in plastic: underfloor heating (UFH) is seen as an upmarket product and so the cachet has rubbed off onto plastic pipe generally. But perhaps the single most important factor in explaining the gaining popularity of plastic pipe is the huge take-up of manufactured joists or I-beams as intermediate floors. Now when it comes to fitting pipework through an I-beam floor, it’s actually about fifteen times easier using flexible plastic pipe than it is using rigid copper — remember, I-beams cannot be notched at the top, the traditional route through floors for copper pipe.

The NHBC technical literature doesn’t have a huge amount to say about plastic plumbing but they do raise occasional concerns. The first one is also a perennial question on the selfbuild forum.

Does plastic plumbing require earthing? The answer is basically no, but it’s not quite as straightforward as that. What is clear is that, from the point of view of electric shocks, plastic plumbing makes a house a little bit safer as you reduce the risk of suffering a life-threatening shock. If some electrical appliance develops a fault and becomes ‘live’, the danger to someone touching it increases when they are making a good electrical connection with something else. Being naked in a wet bathroom makes you an A1 electrical contact.

Now you won’t find any mention of ‘earthing’, let alone ‘supplementary bonding’ in the NHBC regulations, though there is some guidance in Part P of the E&W building regs. It’s a subject about which most housebuilders are blissfully ignorant: it’s just some safety routine that the electrician has to do for reasons that are pretty obscure. But the facts are that if you plumb in copper, you have to link the pipe systems together so that you can’t have hugely different voltages between them. If you plumb in plastic, even if you use copper tails on the exposed pipework, you don’t need to earth bond the pipes.

Another FAQ on plastic plumbing is/was “Do plastic pipes require thermal insulation?" It is usual to wrap insulation abound hot water pipes in certain locations, notably between the boiler and the hot water tanks, to prevent excessive heat loss. Plastic pipe will lose less heat than copper but not that much less, so the answer is, “Yes, plastic pipes do require thermal insulation sleeving in the very same places as copper pipe.”

Finally, what are the recommended fixing centres for plastic pipe supplying hot and cold water and central heating? Hot plastic pipes tend to sag. Does it matter? Not a great deal. The critical question involves running plastic pipes through joisted or I-beam floors: the word seems to be that floor beams 600mm apart — the standard distance — really don’t need additional support. But if the pipework is exposed, the supports should be more frequent.

10 Comments:

Blogger William said...

Any feedback on the merits of "plastic" hot and cold water vs copper from the point of view of vermin attack... rats, mice, possum, housemartens etc chewing pipe and causing disaster in hard to acces places.
Thanks
William

2:11 pm  
Anonymous Jon said...

I installed a plastic waste system in my 150 year old house, but I did not check prior to installing that I had mice and unfortunately they chewed through the waste system and it leaked all over the back of the cupboard. My advice is to check prior to installing and plastic system that all vermin has been eradicated.

4:32 pm  
Blogger Nitheesh said...

Very nice. This is beautiful work.

Hot Water Service Repair

11:06 am  
Blogger debbie2002 said...

Was just wondering what the life expectancy of installing a new plastic pipe cold/hot water and central heating system. Are there any insurance issues with installing this type of pipe system also?

No mice but recently stripped out from the human variety known as skuzzies and not too keen to have a re-enactment of that day hence wanting to install plastic. It was a heart breaking event to see the whole of your copper gone (electrics too). The property was only vacant for 2 weeks so replacing with plastic is quite important to us.

Any advice welcome about replacing with plastic pipe. (I wish we could buy plastic radiators too as most of them have also gone.) Trust me you would not believe how much can go in such a short time.

Anyway main question is plastic pipe worse on insurance due to things like mice before we replace with this. We all know the insurance company will never give a straight answer. I want to use plastic to stop it being nicked again. I don't however want it to fail in 5-10 years and cause other problems due to seals failing. At least I know copper pipe will last years when fitted correctly.

11:58 pm  
Anonymous Leaside Plumbing said...

Plastic plumbing is a new tactic which is introduced in market .This technique not only provides benefit to its customers but also its installers. It has become possible to detect leakage and replacement of whole pipe line when it becomes faulty.

12:13 pm  
Blogger Michael clarke said...

I was very encouraged to find this site.Great blog article about this topic.I wanted to thank you for this special read.
Plumber Alabaster, Al

9:18 am  
Blogger darren sammy said...

This is a good post. I'm definitely going to look into it.Really very useful tips are provided here.thank you so much.Keep up the good works.
Plumber Birmingham, Al

10:35 am  
Anonymous Olivia said...

Plastic pipes have their advantages.

4:05 pm  
Blogger John said...

cheap rolex replica watches
pandora jewelry store
canada goose sale
fit flops
mulberry uk
chaussures louboutin
polo ralph lauren
coach outlet store
uggs outlet
fendi bags
2017224yuanyuan

11:53 am  
Blogger Mohammad Emran Hossin said...

Wisconsin Mortgage Corporation has been providing quality home loans across Wisconsin.Meet our loan officers. Please choose the loan officer that you were referred to view their personal page and apply online.Best Wisconsin Mortgage Broker Each loan officer's page includes the following services.

3:23 pm  

Post a Comment

<< Home